History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 177)

Two views of the head-on collision at Britton's Woods, near Britton's Woods, near Shippensburg, October 18, 1888. Baggageman Charles Bittner was killed in the "telescoped" baggage car in the lower picture.

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History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 178,179)

Anyone with a working knowledge of railroading will know that under such circumstances many more such runs were made than ever reported. A big reason for many of these was the vanity of the enginemen and conductors. Engineman Jacob Fuller told a reporter in 1886, "I am making better time now than Joseph Miller (in support of the Union Forces at Antietam) ever did with his famous powder train." Individual professional standing was all Important to the crewmen, and their preoccupation with it built up over time. They regarded an accident-free record as essential, but a concurrent on-time record grew to be equally so, at least to their pride. At that point, the temptation to risk their accident record to save their on-time record was sometime irresistible. This state of mind finally resulted in disaster on Thursday, October 18,1888, when the railroad had one of its biggest accidents since the Civil War.

On that day, Train 14, with conductor George Bowman and engineman Jacob Fuller, departed Martinsburg at 732 a.m. on its eastbound run to Harrisburg. It was delayed somewhat by heavy passenger business and by a special train bound from Chambersburg out the south Penn branch, but it managed to make up most of the lost time. Summit station, four miles west of Shippensburg,

was train 14's regular meeting point with train 9, its counterpart from Harrisburg in the opposite direction but, on arriving there, conductor Bowman was told that No.9 was running late, and was ordered to proceed only s far as Shippensburg.

Train No.9, with conductor Alexander Linn and engineman William Hysong, had encountered much greater delay. Its regular Harrisburg departure time of 745 a.m. was postponed 26 minutes by a late Philadelphia connection, then an additional eight minutes by minor engine trouble. At Carlisle the train was 40 minutes late, held back by extra cars of Excursionist bound for the Hagerstown Fair. Linn departed with orders to proceed to Shippensburg.

Meanwhile, train 14 reached Shippensburg where operator Charles Kanaga told Bowman that dispatcher Yoh had not yet telegraphed further orders. Ignoring this, Bowman proceeded with his train. The result was a head-on collision at speed of trains 9 and 14. It occurred on a reverse curve with poor visibility at Britton's Woods, 1.5 miles east of Shippensburg.

The engines were forced into each other up to the cylinder heads, but no cars turned over and no fire broke out. The baggage cars of both trains 'telescoped," and that of the westbound train completely so. In that car, baggageman Charles Bittner was killed. Most of the crew members and some of the passengers were injured. Col. George B. Wiestling, Superintendent of the Mont Alto Railroad, by chance a passenger on the eastbound train, took charge of the care of the injured. Three doctors came from Shippensburg, and within an hour Superintendent Boyd and President Kennedy arrived by special train. Coroner Shalley and the Cumberland County Court held an attended inquest, in which railroad officials, crew members, passengers, and other witnesses were questioned. The verdict was that the collision and the death of Bittner were due to the action of conductor Bowman and engineman Fuller in taking their train beyond Shippensburg without orders and contrary to established rules. Bowman was discharged from the company, and 15 months later was reported working for a railroad in Georgia. Fuller, whose record with the company extended back to prewar days, was taken out of road service, and made Roundhouse Foreman in Hagerstown.

History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 207)

The roundhouse crew at Chambersburg, taken some years earlier than the foregoing picture. Second from left, holding boy's hand, Christain Fuller; third from left, Basil Minnich; fifth from left, Samuel Shryock; ninth from left, George Lane; tenth from left ---Dunleavy ; second from right, John Fuller; third from right, Chip Foreman. Others unknown. Below The roundhouse in Chambersburg, completed in 1889. Man in overcoat is General Foreman Lawrence, others unknown.

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History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 183)

Passenger Station at Winchester, Virginia

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History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 213)

Frolicsome Chambersburgers pose on the catwalk of No. 36 at Mont Alto Park, 1894. Left to right Mrs. Margaret Manger, Harry Smith, Minnie Kline, John Eckels, Carrie Sierer, Howard Greenawalt, D. Edward Long, Charles Clugston, Carl Shull, and E.H. Frey.

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History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 279)

The occasion is the maiden run of No. 41, the CVRR's first official car, in 1904. The unidentified man, third from the right on the car is believed to be Charles Augustus Fuller.

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History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 186)

Street Map of Chambersburg, Pa of 1868 showing the Fuller House

CVRRPage186a.jpg (298882 bytes)

History of the CUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD 1835-1919,
by Paul J. Westhaeffer, Washington,D.C.Chapter,
National Railway Historical Society, Publisher (page 152)

CVRR freight engine No. 44 dips its stack in the waters of Letort Spring! The scene is a short distance south of Gettysburg Junction (Carlisle), Saturday, August 9, 1884. When it derailed, the train was hauling a load of Pennsylvania National 0uardsmen back to Harrisburg from a two week encampment on the Gettysburg Battlefield. Conductor Frank Small and Fireman Fuller Thompson were killed.

Veteran Engineman Leonard (Uncle Len) Dornberger was unhurt. The summer of 1884 was the first time the Gettysburg & Harrisburg had hauled guardsmen to the Gettysburg encampment, since that road had just opened for business in the spring of the year. This was a mass movement, and required the use of 18 locomotives and 200 passenger cars, most of which were borrowed from the PRR. A total of 35,000 passengers were hauled to and from the battlefield, 8,000 of them guardsmen, and the remainder Civil War veterans and tourists. A defective switch was thought to have caused the accident.

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Franklin Repository and Transcript, May 2, 1860, p. 5, c. 1
Excelsior

Not long since we gave an account of the manufacturing of a locomotive at the work- shops of the Cumberland Valley Rail Road, in this place. It is now our duty to record the fact that another one is being built in the same establishment. We claim for the Chambersburg works a high place in the role of machine shops. No engine of its size--and it was made for certain work--can surpass the "Enterprise," the engine which was turned out by this concern last Fall. We had the pleasure of inspecting some of the beautiful specimens of workmanship intended for the new engine, and say, without hesitation, that we never saw anything more perfect--the product of man's skill. These beautiful samples of handicraft, which we examined were made by MR. JULIUS F. GIBBS, and MR. JACOB FULLER, under the supervision of MR. ABRAHAM HULL, the Master Mechanic of the establishment, with whom both these young gentlemen learned their trade. Any young man who can secure a situation under so faithful an instructor as MR. HULL, cannot fail to make a first-class workman, if he has brains enough to retain the necessary instructions he will receive.

The Franklin Repository August 15, 1860
Article - Column 1
Lincoln, Hamlin, Curtin

Names: Carlisle, T. M. ; Henninger, Jacob ; Shaffer, Jacob ; Henderson, Frank ; Caufman, A. D. ; Merklein, G. H. ; Shillito, S. M. ; Kirby, D. Brainerd ; Glosser, J. F. ; Earley, B. ; Seilhamer, G. O. ; McGrath, A. C. ; Foltz, M. A. ; Coover, Jacob ; Grossman, Jacob ; Flack, A. ; Heck, George S. ; Dennerline, J. G. A. ; Eyster, Lewis B. ; Kirby, J. R. ; Saunders, William ; Etter, E. G. ; Greenawalt, S. F. ; Hamilton, A. B. ; Bishop, H. ; Seibert, J. W. ; Eiker, D. M. ; Houser, A. W. ; Siegrist, W. K. ; McKeehan, J. W. ; Keagy, Franklin ; Ely, Solomon ; Murry, William ; Fahnestock, D. S. ; Gillan, James B. ; Wright, J. Boyd ; Leisher, D. F. ; Oaks, John S. ; Merklein, Thomas W. ; Lippy, William H. C. ; Myers, Thomas ; Housum, P. B. ; Eyster, George ; Rankin, A. N. ; Culbertson, John P. ; Aughinbaugh, James ; Henninger, Frederick ; Pearse, N. P. ; Huber, William ; Oyster, Christian ; Gibbs, J. F. ; Fuller, Jacob Jr. ; Hull, U. S. ; Woods, Lafayette ; Seibert, William C. ; Hawbecker, E. ; Deal, J. W. ; Minnich, M. C. ; McKesson, James ; Taylor, K. Shannon ; Taylor, John W. ; Aughinbaugh, John ; Pickle, John ; Eyster, John S. ; Gross, John ; Fortescue, Harry C. ; Hazelet, R. P. ; Snider, J. N. ; Strike, John ; Embich, John S. ; Jarrett, Jacob ; Auxer, George H. ; Maurer, Trobe ; Finefrock, John ; Snider, John ; Renfrew, James M. ; Snider, Peter A. ; Miles, G. L. ; Reges, John W. ; Stouffer, David F. ; Wood, T. B. ; Rodgers, John ; Houser, L. D. C. ; Reidenbaugh, Lewis Summary: A list is given of members of the "Chambersburg Wide Awakes," and that they will meet to organize on Aug. 17th at the Indian Queen Hotel. Also given is the explanation of the association's purpose, as defined by the Chicago organization--a political police force as protection for Republican speakers, candidates, meetings and polls.

The Franklin Repository September 26, 1860
Article - Column 1
The Ball Rolling

Names: McCauley, Mr. I. H. ; Deitz, Mr. George A. ; Caufman, Mr. A. D. ; Dennerline, Mr. John G. A. ; McLellan, Mr. William ; Shaffer, Mr. Jacob ; Early, Mr. T. J. ; Housum, Mr. P. B. ; Henninger, Mr. F. ; Rankin, Mr. A. N. ; Casey, Hon. Joseph ; McClure, Col. A. K. ; Eyster, J. A. Esq. ; Brown, Jacob S. ; Stumbaugh, Col. F. S. ; Fletcher, Josiah W. Esq. ; Kennedy, Col. T. B. ; Davidson, James Esq. ; McPherson, Hon. Edward ; Kreichbaum, Mr. Peter ; Ebbert, Mr. Leonard ; Dernfeldt, Mr. William ; Fuller, Mr. Christian Summary: Description of a Republican rally at which Col. A. G. Curtin and Carl Schurz, Esq., a Wisconsin German orator, spoke. Wide Awakes from Fayetteville, Greenvillage and Scotland, in a meeting later that day, elected officers, and the speakers of the earlier rally spoke again.