Introduction

G850512_20.jpg (107523 bytes)This book was written with the purpose of documenting a historical record of the relations of my family. I am grateful of the help given to me by my aunts, Paula Dralle and Mary Virginia Rosenberger. I also wish to thank my friend Walter Putze in Bremen, Germany who has done all of the research there.

To understand this book, you must look at it from my standpoint. I, Arthur F Dralle Jr., am the genealogist and I am numbered #01. The genealogist's father and mother are of the second generation, and are accordingly assigned the next two numbers in logical sequence, with the male head of the household always given an even number and the female always given an odd number. All fathers are two times the number of their child and the mother is two times plus one.

What Is a First Cousin, Twice Removed? If someone walked up to you and said "Howdy, I'm your third cousin, twice removed," would you have any idea what they meant? Most people have a good understanding of basic relationship words such as "mother," "father," "aunt," "uncle," "brother," and "sister." But what about the relationship terms that we don't use in everyday speech? Terms like "second cousin" and "first cousin, once removed"? We don't tend to speak about our relationships in such exact terms ("cousin" seems good enough when you are introducing one person to another), so most of us aren't familiar with what these words mean. Sometimes, especially when working on your family history, it's handy to know how to describe your family relationships more exactly. The definitions below should help you out.

Cousin (a.k.a "first cousin") Your first cousins are the people in your family who have two of the same grandparents as you. In other words, they are the children of your aunts and uncles.

Second Cousin Your second cousins are the people in your family who have the same great-grandparents as you., but not the same grandparents.

Third, Fourth, and Fifth Cousins Your third cousins have the same great-great-grandparents, fourth cousins have the same great-great-great-grandparents, and so on.

Removed When the word "removed" is used to describe a relationship, it indicates that the two people are from different generations. You and your first cousins are in the same generation (two generations younger than your grandparents), so the word "removed" is not used to describe your relationship. The words "once removed" mean that there is a difference of one generation. For example, your mother's first cousin is your first cousin, once removed. This is because your mother's first cousin is one generation younger than your grandparents and you are two generations younger than your grandparents. This one-generation difference equals "once removed."

Twice removed means that there is a two-generation difference. You are two generations younger than a first cousin of your grandmother, so you and your grandmother's first cousin are first cousins, twice removed.